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“… it allowed me to be more of the person I aspire to be, The Best in The World at What I Do”

I have always been better with the written word than the spoken one and for me working from home, allowing me to be more of the person I aspire to be, revealed itself to be very much a privilege. While for some the lack of interaction can make it easy for minor anxieties and frustrations to spiral into existential crises, for me, it gives me time to think, allows me to write considered arguments, and makes me more articulate.

I am a business and management consultant, a free thinking creative systemic strategic planner and most of my days involve reading reports, finding obscure problems, addressing and solving them for the benefit of my clients. When in the office, attempting to share my ideas often meant stumbling over my words and sometimes blurting out a dumbed-down version of what I was trying to say or demonstrate. But these days, most of my work-related interaction with either my clients, contributors and associates are through office and social media chat apps. This means I have time to craft my comments before I utter them.

Now, I can spend a minute writing them down as clearly as possible, making a better case for the changes I would like to make, recommend or see implemented. The slowed interaction gives me time to think, allows me to write considered arguments, and makes me more articulate. Essentially, it allows me to be more of the person I aspire to be, the best in the world at what I do. What is more, the terrain has evened out. Everyone is on the same platform, equally accessible, and they can answer me when it is convenient.

Overall, in these days of pandemic, the toll of isolation far outweighs the benefits of reduced social anxiety.

Michel Ouellette JMD

 

J. Michael Dennis, ll.l., ll.m.
Strategic Systemic Planning… and Many Other Things

https://lefuturistedailynews.com/about-2/  

Amanda Gorman, The 22-year-old Harvard poet that stole the Biden inauguration show

When day comes, we ask ourselves where can we find light in this never-ending shade?
The loss we carry, a sea we must wade.
We’ve braved the belly of the beast.
We’ve learned that quiet isn’t always peace,
and the norms and notions of what “just” is isn’t always justice.
And yet, the dawn is ours before we knew it.
Somehow we do it.
Somehow we’ve weathered and witnessed a nation that isn’t broken,
but simply unfinished.
We, the successors of a country and a time where a skinny Black girl descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president, only to find herself reciting for one.

And yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine,
but that doesn’t mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect.
We are striving to forge our union with purpose.
To compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters, and conditions of man.
And so we lift our gazes not to what stands between us, but what stands before us.
We close the divide because we know, to put our future first, we must first put our differences aside.
We lay down our arms so we can reach out our arms to one another.
We seek harm to none and harmony for all.
Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true:
That even as we grieved, we grew.
That even as we hurt, we hoped.
That even as we tired, we tried.
That we’ll forever be tied together, victorious.
Not because we will never again know defeat, but because we will never again sow division.

Scripture tells us to envision that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree and no one shall make them afraid.
If we’re to live up to our own time, then victory won’t lie in the blade, but in all the bridges we’ve made.
That is the promise to glade, the hill we climb, if only we dare.
It’s because being American is more than a pride we inherit.
It’s the past we step into and how we repair it.
We’ve seen a force that would shatter our nation rather than share it.
Would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy.
This effort very nearly succeeded.
But while democracy can be periodically delayed,
it can never be permanently defeated.
In this truth, in this faith, we trust,
for while we have our eyes on the future, history has its eyes on us.
This is the era of just redemption.
We feared it at its inception.
We did not feel prepared to be the heirs of such a terrifying hour,
but within it, we found the power to author a new chapter, to offer hope and laughter to ourselves.
So while once we asked, ‘How could we possibly prevail over catastrophe?’ now we assert, ‘How could catastrophe possibly prevail over us?’

We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be:
A country that is bruised but whole, benevolent but bold, fierce and free.
We will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation because we know our inaction and inertia will be the inheritance of the next generation.
Our blunders become their burdens.
But one thing is certain:
If we merge mercy with might, and might with right, then love becomes our legacy and change, our children’s birthright.

So let us leave behind a country better than the one we were left.
With every breath from my bronze-pounded chest, we will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one.
We will rise from the golden hills of the west.
We will rise from the wind-swept north-east where our forefathers first realized revolution.
We will rise from the lake-rimmed cities of the midwestern states.
We will rise from the sun-baked south.
We will rebuild, reconcile, and recover.
In every known nook of our nation, in every corner called our country,
our people, diverse and beautiful, will emerge, battered and beautiful.
When day comes, we step out of the shade, aflame and unafraid.
The new dawn blooms as we free it.
For there is always light,
if only we’re brave enough to see it.
If only we’re brave enough to be it.

 

J. Michael Dennis Syndicated Columnist … and other things

 

John Matze, Parler’s CEO: “There is the possibility Parler will be unavailable on the internet for up to a week as we rebuild from scratch.” 

Following the Trump Washington Capitol riot of January 6, Amazon Web Services decided to cut off Parler servers. The move came after Google and Apple also banned the infamous right-wing extremist’s social app, citing a violation of terms and lack of moderation.

Amazon Web Services is the largest cloud provider with Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform coming in second and third place respectively and it is unclear what hosting option Parler will be able to use.

Parler’s Revival On Public Cloud Is Unlikely

Even if the right-wing social network Parler was not being rejected by every major public cloud and hosting company, it would find it almost impossible to move to another site. According to its CEO John Matze, “Parler will be back … many are competing for our business”.

Bunkum! Matze

With everything that is going on right now in the Trump’s universe and your right-wing extremists and terrorists friends, I do not see any major Public Cloud or hosting company willing to give parler a home anytime soon. You want to get back in business? You will need to build your own infrastructure from scratch.

From your own admission on Fox News, “… no one wants to work with Parler after Amazon dropped the company … Bringing Parler back up is basically impossible.”

As I understand it, this is the one and only reason why you are now suing Amazon: to have your Amazon Web Services account reinstated.

Good luck… This will never happen!

You are down for the count and so is Trump.

J. Michael Dennis

Syndicated Columnist … and other things

 
Dear readers,
 
Starting at around 4:30PM Eastern Time December 15th, Google suffered a global outage. A catastrophic failure at Gmail had caused emails sent to Gmail to permanently fail and bounce back.
 
The error message from Gmail was reading as follow:
 
 
550-5.1.1 The email account that you tried to reach does not exist.
 
 
This was a global issue impacting all email providers trying to send email to Gmail, not only JMD Systemics, JMD Online and King Global Earth and Environmental Sciences Corporation.
 
Because Gmail was sending a permanent failure message, our mail servers were not able to receive any of your messages sent to our corporate addresses originating from Gmail.
 
 
The same day, 6:51 PM on December 15, Google was issuing the following message:
 
 
The  problem with Gmail has been resolved. We apologize for the  inconvenience and thank you for your patience and continued support.  Please rest assured that system reliability is a top priority at Google,  and we are making continuous improvements to make our systems better…

 

Reality check: This problem has not been resolved. Our mail servers were not able to receive any of your messages sent to our corporate addresses originating from Gmail. If you try emailing us at any of our corporate addresses originating from Gmail, here is an example of the message that you will receive:

 

Delivery has failed to these recipients or groups:
jmd@jmdsystemics.com (jmd@jmdsystemics.com)Your message couldn’t be delivered. The Domain Name System (DNS) reported that the recipient’s domain does not exist.
 
 
We are closely monitoring this regrettable and unfortunate situation. At this time, there is little we can do until Google fixes the problem.
 
 
Sorry for the inconvenience.
 

 

J. Michael Dennis

Syndicated Columnist … and other things

Here’s what to expect long term from the coronavirus pandemic: “Stay Home”

The coronavirus has uprooted life as we know it. Everything from our social gatherings to our daily errands has been completely changed and most of us are not too fond of the switch. Realistically and sadly, though, life will not go back to what it was for quite some time. Life is going to look different for the next few years, but what exactly does that mean?

Expect the world to change to a mask-wearing culture

A year from now, and even beyond that, expect to still see people wearing masks in public, especially people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Mask-wearing will become a new normal, the way it has been in many Asian countries in recent years.

There will be fewer business trips and more remote work opportunities

With the increase in digital technologies and the realization that some industries can easily continue without sending staff across the county or across the globe, expect business trips to be reduced for people in most industries. With the increase in digital technologie, we no longer have to be physically in the same room to accomplish many things. Expect corporations to be more flexible with remote work policies, especially if work is still getting accomplished at home while keeping people from getting sick and helping the company with operations costs.

Concerts and sporting events

Do not expect crowded sporting events and packed concerts to become part of our new normal. It is going to be hard to convince people to go back to large indoor entertainment and recreational gatherings. What you will see is clusters of people at smaller gatherings. The new normal will be for people to avoid large gatherings in enclosed space. Outdoor social and entertainment smaller gatherings will be preferred and part of the norm.

Expect significant psychological, societal and cultural impacts

People are profoundly affected by the major events that occur in their lifetime. Accordingly, t is to be expected that modern-day society will be shaped by the COVID-19 pandemic. The psychological after-effects of disasters typically emerge six months after the event ends. Long-term mental health effects and societal changes as a result of the pandemic, which has kept millions of people isolated socially and physically for months, are to be expected. There are going to be many long-term effects. We will see a significant increase in depressions, suicide rates and marital problems.

Expect certain levels of discord throughout communities

While the vast majority of people are counting down the days before we find a vaccine, dark days are to be expected. There is a tremendous likelihood of conflict, social discord and unanticipated consequences with the arrival of the vaccine. The distribution of the vaccine will be chaotic and problematic. There will be inequities and many will refuse to be vaccinated. Communities, co-workers, friends and families will be faced with tough decisions regarding everything from the topic of how to safely socialize after months and months of isolation to sending their child to school where there may be unvaccinated students.

Finally, do not expect the virus to go away completely

The COVID-19 coronavirus will not disappear when the vaccine is deployed. Many are opposed to vaccines. We are already seeing people saying they will refuse for themselves, their children and the members of their family, to be vaccine thus, severely limiting the ability to create any form of herd immunity, which would provide protection for those who cannot get the vaccine or have not yet been vaccinated. The virus will still be circulating even after an effective vaccine is widely available as a result of those who choose not to get the vaccine.

Michel Ouellette JMD, ll.l., ll.m.
Systemic Strategic Planning / Crisis & Reputation Management

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 9af4a-file.png

JMD Systemics

A division of King Global Earth and Environmental sciences Corporation

Web: JMD Systemics | bunkumless.com

Michel Ouellette / Joseph Michael Dennis,isa former attorney, a Crisis & Reputation Management Expert,a Public Affairs & Corporate Communications Specialist, a Warrior for Common Sense and Free Speech.


Follow JMDlive on: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedInInstagram | Tumblr

The COVID-19 Coronavirus Pandemic: A major opportunity to transform your business and reinvent all your processes.

Never let a good crisis go to waste. It could be a great opportunity.

No one can predict when a crisis will occur.

Most people, corporations and brands will experience a potential crisis about every two years and not all public relations firms are fully equipped to handle events disrupting your business operations, threatens to harm people, damages your reputation, and negatively impacts your finances.

Most crisis management companies are communication experts with backgrounds in public relations, social media, and reputation marketing. While those strategies alone may have worked in the past, they will not be enough in 2020 and beyond.

Crisis management planning begins long before an issue arises. It can be tempting to put off risk management when things are going well. However, inadequate preparation can have serious operational, legal, and public relations consequences.

Michel Ouellette JMD, ll.l., ll.m.

Systemic Strategic Planning, Crisis & Reputation Management

https://www.bunkumless.com/

JMD Systemics

 A division of King Global Earth and Environmental sciences Corporation

Web: JMD Systemics | bunkumless.com

Michel Ouellette / Joseph Michael Dennis, is a former attorney, a Crisis & Reputation Management Expert, a Public Affairs & Corporate Communications Specialist, a Warrior for Common Sense and Free Speech.

Follow JMDlive on: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn Instagram | Tumblr

How you Respond to a Crisis Will Affect Your Reputation for Years to Come.

The evidence is irrefutable.

Without proper preparation, individuals, public and private organizations of any size can be blindsided by a long list of possible crises.

How an organization responds to a crisis can dramatically affect your reputation, revenues and even your share price. How you communicate to media and key audiences following a crisis situation is as important as how you respond to the crisis.

Knowing when and how to respond to requests for media comments, acting quickly and prudently is key to maintain or restoring your reputation.

Michel Ouellette JMD, ll.l., ll.m.

Systemic Strategic Planning, Crisis & Reputation Management

https://www.bunkumless.com/

JMD Systemics

 A division of King Global Earth and Environmental sciences Corporation

Web: JMD Systemics | bunkumless.com

Michel Ouellette / Joseph Michael Dennis, is a former attorney, a Crisis & Reputation Management Expert, a Public Affairs & Corporate Communications Specialist, a Warrior for Common Sense and Free Speech.

Follow JMDlive on: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn Instagram | Tumblr

Is Your Business Digitally Ready to Face the New Reality?

COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC 

Focus on the short and sweet

Minimizing the Coronavirus Impact on Your Business

The 2020 Coronavirus Effect and Your Marketing Strategy

Is your Business ready for what comes next?

“It doesn’t get much better than a moment of delight on social media.”

For most businesses, social media engagement seems like a slam dunk strategy. Everyone should be doing it, right? But it certainly comes with its blind spots and questions.

One of the quickest and easiest ways to set yourself apart on social media is simply to reply to all your customers, all the time. A helpful and happy response, will invariably propel you ahead of the curve. All it takes is engaging with the people who want to engage with you.

Eighty-eight percent of brands do not respond to messages that need a reply. Simply by engaging with your customers and clients, by engaging with the people who want to engage with you, be among the elite twelve percent.

JMD Systemics can help you do just that. Here are some tips that you can implement today.

1. Social media engagement is public

Social media engagement allows you to naturally amplify your brand’s voice and tone. Social media engagement allows you to propel your interactions front-and-center before a larger audience.

Traditional private one on one private interactions like email are fine, but with social channels like Twitter, these interactions can be public, at least to start. The same goes for engaging with your audience in Instagram comments or Facebook reviews.

You are already wow-ing your private audience in other channels like email and live chat! With social media, the awesomeness you are delivering becomes visible to everyone. Those amazing audience interactions that create strong word of mouth marketing for you are now amplified to a much larger audience.

Existing and potential customers get to see first-hand that you are responsive and actively supporting your products and services.

2. Social media engagement is fast and focused

You can deliver delight very fast and in a focused way, chatting with your audience about specific topics and campaigns or helping solve particular problems that they are facing.

Focusing on the short and sweet, something magical happens: the barrier to entry for your audience drops dramatically. They now have an easy way to converse with you, anytime. Focusing and specific topics mean you can reply faster and engage deeper with your audience.

Faster responses equal happier customers, which equals more ROI. Happier customers and clients are the one big factor that affects any bottom line: faster responses actually generate revenue for all brands.

Because of its fast and friendly nature, social media is often preferred over other channels of getting in touch. The more and faster you respond to your audience, the better and faster prospective customers and clients learn that social media are great places to connect directly with both, you and your brand.

3. Social media is where your customers are.

Today, in these days of COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, social media is where your customers are. You can achieve a huge scale of engagement by being responsive on social media.

A vast majority of your audience of your prospective customers and clients are on social media throughout the day. It is where they are at and where it often makes the most sense for them to reach out and get in touch. Today, people spend most of their waking hours staring at screens.

Let it be known that people spend an average of nearly four hours a day consuming media on a screen. A growing percentage of that viewing happens on smartphones and apps.

What are you waiting for?

Michel Ouellette JMD, ll.l., ll.m

Systemic Strategic Planning / Crisis & Reputation Management

Email: jmd@jmdsystemics.com

Office: 613.539.1793

Skype: jmdlive

Michel Ouellette / Joseph Michael Dennis, is a former attorney, a Crisis & Reputation Management Expert,a Public Affairs & Corporate Communications Specialist, a Warrior for Common Sense and Free Speech.

JMD Systemics

  A division of King Global Earth and Environmental sciences Corporation

Web: JMD Systemics | bunkumless.com

Follow JMDlive on:

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn Instagram | Tumblr

Today and tomorrow, like it or not, the future belongs to crowds.

We are now living in a society where there are too many chiefs and not enough indians.

Remember the images of the Chinese pro-democracy protesters dispersed by troops in Tiananmen Square; the images of the several million mourners streaming through the streets of Tehran to the funeral of Ayatollah Khomeini; the images of a “tent city” emerging in Tompkins Square Park; the images of hundreds of English soccer fans penned against a chain-link fence during a match at Hillsborough Stadium, in Sheffield?

The year 2020 is now defined by images of crowds to rival those of the past: people waiting in mile-long lines at food banks; police using tear gas to disperse protesters; thousands of people gathered in support of Black Life Matters, Pro-life, LGBTQ rights and so on. More than ever, the protests of the past few years have shown that the most immediate and dramatic way for people to register discontent and call for change is by massing in the streets in frank and perilous defiance of the establishment and public order.

More than ever, people are standing in the streets rather that in the voting polls.

A dire consequence: governments, legislators and politicians are no longer adopting legislations and policies to build a better society, they are doing it to please the crowds and make sure to be re-elected and maintain their own personal power. To make things worse, news media in search of better ratings, are throwing oil on the fire: news commentators are no longer reporting, they are commenting; the more incipient and incendiary they are, the more profit. The real problem of the world today is not the Covid-19, the real problem is the degeneracies and degeneration of the people.

Imbecility is now the trademark of most of our populations.

Among the younger generation, progressive values are hegemonic. On issues ranging from LGBTQ and women’s rights to anti-racism and immigration, younger people are attempting to communicate their moral values on social media to the older generation. “Black Lives Matter” is just one flashpoint in that struggle.

2020 is getting really crazy, perhaps the most astounding year in generations, a year of norm-shattering abnormalities with an unlimited potential of destruction that might culminate in world-wide conflicts.

Based on the crisis-infused year we are in now, it is easy to predict that the balance of 2020 will unfold with even more craziness and long forgot aberrations. As I see it, as for the deluge, the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, the Covid-19 is a benediction that will purge the earth from all the Trumps of this world, from all the malefactors of an evil society.

Michel Ouellette JMD, ll.l., ll.m.

Systemic Strategic Planning, Crisis & Reputation Management

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 9af4a-file.png

JMD Systemics

A division of King Global Earth and Environmental sciences Corporation

Web: JMD Systemics | bunkumless.com

Michel Ouellette / Joseph Michael Dennis,isa former attorney, a Crisis & Reputation Management Expert,a Public Affairs & Corporate Communications Specialist, a Warrior for Common Sense and Free Speech.


Follow JMDlive on: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedInInstagram | Tumblr